Mexico urges Trump to back down on ‘unfair’ tariff threat

Jayson Oluwatimilehin

Born and raised in the United States of America by Nigerian parents, Jayson Oluwatimilehin is an avid writer and Journalist with specialty in researching about the entertainment industry.

Jayson developed interest in Journalism after he finished his education from Mountain Top University in Nigeria, finishing with a first class in English Language and interned for a few media companies in Lagos and bagged a higher diploma from the Nigerian Institute of Journalism before joining Theelitepost's editorial team.

You can contact him at jayson@theelitepost.com or give him a call on +23489765502
Jayson Oluwatimilehin

Mexico’s president on Friday (May 31, 2019) urged his U.S. counterpart Donald Trump to back down from threats to impose tariffs on its exports to the United States, in a dispute over migration that could create a major economic shock for Mexico.

Trump said he will introduce punitive tariffs on June 10 if Mexico does not halt the flow of illegal immigration from Central America to the United States, battering Mexican financial assets and hurting stocks worldwide.

The ultimatum from Trump is the biggest foreign policy test to date for Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, who during his six months in power has consistently sought to deflect the U.S. president’s barbs and avoid embroiling himself in a confrontation.

Lopez Obrador told a regular briefing that Mexico is carrying out its responsibility in immigration policy and stressed the need for diplomacy.

The Mexican President said he believed Trump would understand that tariffs were not the way to resolve the matter, but urged Mexicans to unite around his government to face the challenge.

Trump said on Thursday he would ratchet up tariffs unless Mexico stopped people from illegally crossing into the United States. The plan would impose a 5% tariff on Mexican imports starting on June 10 and increase monthly, up to 25% on Oct. 1.

Such a plan would deliver a heavy blow to Mexico’s economy, which relies heavily on exports to the United States of goods from avocados and tequila to televisions and cars made by companies such as Ford and Nissan. Mexico sends around 80 percent of its exports to the United States.

Mexico’s main stock index fell more than 2% after opening on Friday, and the peso currency was down 3% against the dollar.

Since taking office in December, Lopez Obrador has urged Trump to help him tackle migration by promoting economic development in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador, where most of the migrants apprehended on the U.S. border come from.

A veteran leftist who won a landslide election victory in July 2018, Lopez Obrador has shied away from foreign policy entanglements, preferring to leave diplomacy to Ebrard.

U.S. officials say the immigration system is being overwhelmed by thousands of migrants, many of whom turn themselves over to border officials to claim asylum in the United States. Border facilities are straining to handle large numbers of people and many children.

At least six migrant children have died in U.S. custody or shortly after being released. Apprehensions of migrants on the southwest border hit another record high last month, with 98,977 people arrested

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